Christopher Columbus Newton

 
Pastor FBC Hillsborough, 1886 –
On December 19, 1886 the church met and “On motion Bro. C C Newton was called to serve the church as pastor and we pledge him $180.00 for year for once a month preaching.”  A committee was appointed in February 1887 to have the parsonage painted and repaired.  However, there is no further mention of Newton after his moderating the September 22, 1888 church conference.1 

Christopher Columbus Newton was born March 13, 1844 and grew up in New Hanover County, NC.  Newton was preparing to enter Wake Forest College when the Civil War started in 1861.  He joined the 61st North Carolina Infantry Regiment, Company A, organized at Wilmington, NC in August 1862.  He rose to the rank of corporal and served four years until wounded in the left arm.2,3  After the War, he married Cornelia Herring and together they had three children; Alberta Madara Rosa, Herbert Deberier and William Cary Newton.4  

He attended Wake Forest College; his last year there being 1870.5 He spent seven years, 1877 to 1884, as pastor of the Wells Chapel Baptist Church, Wallace, NC.6  Then he attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from 1884 to 1886.7  In addition to being a student, Newton also served as assistant librarian at the University.  During 1885, he helped the librarian, George T. Winston, reorganize and rearrange the library.  He was called to the Hillsboro Baptist Church in 1886.  In 1887, Newton, his wife, daughter and son (Herbert) were listed as residing on Cleveland Street in Durham, NC.  At the time, he was serving as a home missionary for the Mount Zion Association and pastor of the West End Baptist Church which was undergoing construction on Chapel Hill Street.9 

Newton continued his home missionary work in east and west Durham, NC until he was called to the foreign mission field in 1889.  He, his wife and daughter, Alberta, left for Lagos, Nigeria, Africa in June 1889, arriving there in July.10 Not long after arriving, Newton spent time trying to reconcile differences between the Ebenezer Baptist Church and the First Baptist Church in Lagos. The Ebenezer congregation had followed their native pastor, Moses Ladejo Stone, to form a new church when Stone and Rev. W. J. David, the American Foreign Missionary, had a difference of opinion over salary and furtherance of education.  Through Newton’s efforts, and after the departure of David, Stone rejoined the First Baptist Church, but it was years later that reunification was achieved.11  While in Africa, Newton and his family took several months off to visit Liverpool, England in 1892 and returned to the States for a brief furlough in 1893; returning to Africa in December.  Mrs. Newton became seriously ill with fever and died on July 9, 1894 and was buried in the Lagos cemetery.  Newton became ill with the same fever and doctors decided to transfer him to a cooler climate.  However, he died aboard ship and was buried 300 miles at sea on July 26, 1894. 12 

Their daughter remained on the mission field briefly and then returned home to be married.  Newton’s son, Cary Newton, became a missionary to China.6 

References:
  1. Minutes of First Baptist Church Hillsborough, NC from November 19, 1853 to December 2, 1953.
  2. Newton, Richard M Sr.  Miracles on the Nars’.  Published by Tate Publishing & Enterprise, LLC, Mustang, OK, 2010.
  3. National Park Service: Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System:  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/soldiers.cfm
  4. Family Tree Marker Genealogical Database: Karen-Roberts.  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/r/o/b/Karen-Roberts/GENE14-0002.html
  5. The Howler (Yearbook), 1933.  Published by the Student Body, Wake Forest College, Wake Forest, NC.  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.archive.org/stream/howler1933wake/howler1933wake_djvu.txt
  6. Wells Chapel Baptist Church, Wallace, NC.  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.wellschapel.com/Pastors.htm
  7. North Carolina University Magazine by University of North Carolina (1793-1962) No. 1 Oct 1894 Vol 25 (old series) Vol 14 (new series).  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://books.google.com/books?id=rwM8AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA2&lpg=PA62&ots=FUbhe8YkGD&dq=%22christopher+columbus+newton%22&output=text
  8. Burk, William R. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library and the Sciences, 1795-1902. North Carolina Libraries (Online), 2009. Accessed on March 28, 2011 at:  http://www.ncl.ecu.edu/index.php/NCL/article/viewFile/270/309
  9. Branson, Levi. Directory of Business and Citizens, Durham, NC, 1887. Compiled by Levi Branson, Publisher, Raleigh, NC. Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.archive.org/stream/directoryofbusin1887bran/directoryofbusin1887bran_djvu.txt
  10. Proceedings of the annual meeting of the Baptist State Convention, 1889. Baptist State Convention of North Carolina (Creator).  Edwards, Broughton & Co. in Raleigh.  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.archive.org/details/proceedingsofann1895bapt
  11. Dictionary of African Christian Biography.  Stone, Moses Ladejo c. 1850 to 1913 Baptist Nigeria.  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.dacb.org/stories/nigeria/stone_moses.html
  12. Proceedings of the annual meeting of the Baptist State Convention, 1894. Baptist State Convention of North Carolina (Creator).  Edwards, Broughton & Co. in Raleigh.  Accessed on March 28, 2011 at: http://www.archive.org/details/proceedingsofann1894bapt
 Compiled by Reginald Carter, Historian, FBC Hillsborough
Last Updated: March 28, 2011